Greece and Rome at the Fitzwilliam Museum

The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge houses world-class collections of works of art and antiquities spanning centuries and civilisations.

This short film tells the story of how AHRC funding was instrumental in the creation of the latest Greek and Roman display at the museum.

The extensive Greek and Roman collection spans the period from around 3000 BC to the 4th century AD. The objects range in material and scale from engraved seal-stones to colossal marble figures, from fired clay vessels to monumental inscriptions, from small bronze animals to stone sarcophagi.

The last re-arrangement of Greece and Rome gallery dated back to the 1960s, and over the decades since then the types of questions being asked about the ancient world have radically changed. At the same time huge advances have been made in conservation, environmental control and display design.

This film shows how the redisplay, funded largely by the AHRC, has brought the Fitzwilliam's antiquities collection into the 21st century. The latest modern developments issues that arise from the latest research into ancient Greece and Rome are explored through new object and information arrangements in a modern setting that complements the 19th-century architecture of the gallery.

The AHRC funding also facilitated development of a lot more information about the collections which is now available to visitors. The display incorporates labels, panels, a map and timeline; there is also a series of hand-held information boards for use in the gallery, which introduce some of the underlying themes that can be pursued in various areas of the gallery. All the information in the gallery is now available on the Fitzwilliam Museum’s website (opens in a new window).

Publish date Runtime
03/10/2012 9.57