We are creating a unified UKRI website that brings together the existing research council, Innovate UK and Research England websites.
If you would like to be involved in its development let us know.

Read, Watch and Listen

4

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

400 years of the Bard

In the run up to the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, The AHRC CEO, Andrew Thompson, reflects on how research is ensuring our knowledge of the bard is constantly updated.

4th Equip Academic Research Symposium, India

EqUip: EU-India Platform for the Social Science and Humanities – is the first research collaboration platform between India and the EU specifically dedicated to Social Science and Humanities.

5

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

6

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. See how this image is being projected through this window frame, across the courtyard, onto the tower opposite. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

7

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

8

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

9

From the "Beyond the Battlefields: Käthe Buchler's Photographs of Germany in the Great War" exhibit. Copyright: German Photographic Museum in Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

A ceramic jug that dates from the Romano-British period

This ceramic jug dates from the Romano-British period, and is made from a fine grained black burnished ware known as Upchurch ware. The writing on the object, copied from earlier markings and labels, records the provenance of the object as Uriconium – the Roman name for Wroxeter. Together with a contemporary label, it also records a detailed sequence of acquisition – its discovery in 1866 by ‘Mr Stannier who farmed the land’, its sale to a dealer in Shrewsbury named Mr Last, and Pitt-Rivers’ purchase of the object from Last in 1870 (Pitt Rivers Museum Accession Number 1884.37.31).​