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Susannah Kamanzi at Home

“This is the house where I lived with my husband for over fifty years. I remember our twenty fifth wedding anniversary here – after that we stopped counting!

We celebrated with our family. There was urwagwa and other local beers, singing and clapping. The house was full of people.”

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Susannah Kamanzi at Home

“I was fifteen when I got married.  I don’t know what I looked like then – I had no mirror and no cameras so I don’t remember!

My husband was handsome inside and outside. We lived together until he died after the genocide. It was very peaceful. We never had any fights.”

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Jean Marie Vianney at Church

“In April 1994 the genocide began. Many fled here because we thought in church nobody could be killed. The genocidaires waited. Not out of pity but so that as many people as possible would gather. Then they killed everyone.

My elder sister and her children were killed in this church. Her three children and grandchildren. You can’t say anything… It was night.”

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Jean Marie Vianney at Church

“I’ve been in the church choir since 1970. There are only three or four people remaining from that time.

In 1996 it was difficult to start singing again.  It took courage. The choir means that Rwanda is unity. We don’t think about anything else apart from God and the sound we’re making.”

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Artist Yves Manzi in Butare

“I grew up in exile in Congo. When I returned home I studied at the National University of Rwanda here in Butare. I walked along this road to the university every day for five years.

Now the buildings are disappearing, I want to keep the memories. So I photograph the changing city.”

Read more about Artist Yves Manzi in Butare