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Read, Watch and Listen

Baker Street Studies

This first edition of Baker Street Studies was published in 1934. It contains essays written by members of the early Sherlock Holmes Society and edited by H W Bell. This copy is inscribed to the president of the society, Dick Sheppard, and signed by the secretary A G Macdonnel.

Bust of Jeremy Brett

This fibreglass sculpture is painted to resemble bronze. The sculpture is most likely of Brett, but the resemblance to Benedict Cumberbatch is uncanny. The artist is unknown.

Sherlock Holmes in Advertising

The image of Sherlock Holmes is recognised worldwide. Since the 1900s advertisers have used Sherlock Holmes to sell products ranging from Velox car tyres to Burberry clothing.

Bust of Napoleon

This white marble bust of Napoleon was used in Richard Lancelyn Green's re-creation of 221B Baker Street. It is a reference to ‘The Adventure of the Six Napoleons’ where Sherlock Holmes pursues a criminal intent on stealing and smashing open busts of Napoleon Bonaparte, the French military leader.

Souvenir of the Reichenbach Falls

This wooden box is from the Reichenbach Falls in Meiringen, Switzerland where Holmes fought Moriarty in ‘The Final Problem’ and was thought to have died. The box contains two phials: one filled with water and one with earth collected from the Reichenbach Falls.

Persian Slipper

Persian slippers are often collected by Holmes fans, especially when they re-create Holmes’ rooms for their own 221B Baker Street. This is because in The Musgrave Ritual Watson says Holmes ‘keeps his cigars in the coal-scuttle, [and] his tobacco in the toe end of a Persian slipper’.

'The Blue Carbuncle' Fan Art

The stories of Sherlock Holmes continue to inspire creative artworks. This is a fan illustration of 'The Blue Carbuncle' by Kayla Kinoo (2015).

Anindya Raychaudhuri, University of St Andrews

Anindya Raychaudhuri is working on the way nostalgia is used by diasporic communities to create imaginary and real homes. He has written about the Spanish Civil War and the India/Pakistan partition and the cultural legacies of these wars. He co-hosts a podcast show, State of the Theory, and explores the issues raised by his research in stand-up comedy.

Christopher Kissane, London School of Economics

Christopher Kissane is a historian working on the role of food in history exploring what we can learn about societies and cultures through studying their diets, including what aubergines tell us about the changing tastes in food consumption. His book, which will be published later this year, examines food’s relationship with major issues of early modern society including the Spanish Inquisition and witchcraft.

Edmund Richardson, University of Durham

Edmund Richardson is working on a book about the lost cities of Alexander the Great and the history of their discovery by adventurers and tricksters rather than scholars. His first book was on Victorian Britain and the ‘lowlife’ lived by magicians, con-men and deserters. His latest project is on Victorian ghost-hunters and their obsession with the ancient world which led Houdini to fight against the con-artists making a fortune from fake ‘spirits’.