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AHRC appoints new members to its Advisory Board

Date: 10/05/2012

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) announces the appointment of five new members to the AHRC Advisory Board.

Meeting four times a year the role of the AHRC Advisory Board is to advise Council on the development of strategies that reflect AHRC?s Charter and the challenges facing arts and humanities research. The latest appointments to the Advisory Board are Anne Boddington and Greg Woolf who joined on 1 April 2012 and Gina Fegan, JD Hill and Jennifer Richards who will be joining on 1 September 2012.

Academic Appointments

  • Ms Anne Boddington Dean of Faculty of Arts / University of Brighton: Visual and Performing Arts and Design
  • Professor Jennifer Richards Professor / University of Newcastle: Early Modern Literature and Culture
  • Professor Greg Woolf Professor / University of St Andrews: Ancient History

Business / User Appointments

  • Ms Gina Fegan Founder / D-Media Network
  • Dr JD Hill Head of Research / British Museum

Speaking of the appointments Professor Mark Llewellyn, AHRC Director of Research, said: The AHRC benefits greatly from the experience and expertise that our Advisory Board members bring. We are very pleased to welcome Anne, Greg, Jennifer, Gina and JD to the Advisory Board. Together with other members they contribute a range of perspectives, as researchers and research users, to the advisory process.

The AHRC Advisory Board also develops and recommends priorities, programmes and other initiatives that will deliver the AHRC?s strategies and monitor and report on their progress. The Board assesses and advises Council on the health of the UK's arts and humanities research base and act as a quality assurance body to oversee the procedures regulating the Peer Review College. All final decisions about strategy and future direction are taken by Council.

Notes to editors:

  • AHRC Media contact: Jake Gilmore, Communications Manager, 01793 416021; j.gilmore@ahrc.ac.uk
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council Advisory Board: The role of the Advisory Board is to advise Council on the development of strategies that reflect AHRC's Charter and the challenges facing arts and humanities research. The Board aims to develop and recommend priorities, programmes and schemes that will deliver the AHRC?s strategies, and monitor and report on their progress. The Board advises Council on the health of the arts and humanities research base and acts as a quality assurance body to oversee the procedures regulating peer review. The Board provides reports and recommendations to Council and all final decisions about strategy and future direction are taken by Council.
  • The Advisory Board is chaired by a member of Council and includes at least one other Council member. The Board consists of no more than 15 members, to be approved by Council. Meetings will take place four times per year in London. Members receive a payment of £300 for attendance at each meeting and travel and accommodation costs are also reimbursed. Appointment is initially for a three year term with the option of reappointment available at the end of this period.
  • While the Advisory Board will primarily include academic members, there will also be appropriate representation of non-HEI user communities. Members of the Advisory Board sit on the board as individuals, rather than as representatives of a particular organization or discipline.
  • Advisory Board members are expected to be active advocates for the AHRC and be willing to engage with, champion and lead on AHRC projects and activities as and when required.
  • Members must at all times observe the highest standards of probity, impartiality, integrity and objectivity and are expected to observe The Seven Principles of Public Life, as detailed in the Code of Conduct.
  • The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC): Each year the AHRC provides approximately £98 million from the Government to support research and postgraduate study in the arts and humanities, from languages and law, archaeology and English literature to design and creative and performing arts. In any one year, the AHRC makes hundreds of research awards ranging from individual fellowships to major collaborative projects as well as over 1,000 studentship awards. Awards are made after a rigorous peer review process, to ensure that only applications of the highest quality are funded. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK.
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