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Announcing the shortlist for the Research in Film Awards 2021

We are thrilled to announce this year’s shortlist for the Research in Film Awards (RIFA) 2021. RIFA remains the only film awards dedicated to celebrating arts and humanities research through film.

We received a record number of applications for the Awards this year and our prestigious judging panel has whittled them down to just a handful. The films on the shortlist below represent the best films made during the course of, as a result of, or inspired by arts and humanities research. You can watch them in full or as trailers below – we hope you enjoy them.

Congratulations to everyone on the shortlist. We hope you enjoy the show!

Best Research Film of the Year

The Art of Peace, Medellin

The Art of Peace, Medellin, submitted by Birte Vogel (University of Manchester),shows how marginalised youth in the city of Medellin, Colombia, have responded to ongoing conflict through arts to create alternatives to violence. In recent years, arts-based approaches to peacebuilding have gained traction as an emerging area of research and practice, demonstrating that community-led arts projects, which give agency to local people to change their society, have an important impact upon peace formation in various stages of conflict. The Art of Peace, Medellin is based on fieldwork carried out in Colombia, including participatory workshops involving local artists from Medellin that enabled them to tell their stories to a global audience and to challenge the stereotypes of the city as depicted in Netflix series such as Narcos.

The team behind The Art of Peace, Medellin:

  • A film by: Si Mitchell and Charlie Miller
  • Production Company: The Mono Grande
  • Production: Ruth Daniel (In Place of War), Teresa Ó Brádaigh Bean (University of Manchester), Roberta McCaughan (In Place of War)
  • Translation: Camilla Robinson, Miguel Barreto De Sousa Henriques, Nicolas Palacio, Oriana Garzon, Pamela Ospina
  • Project research conducted for the Colombian case study: Teresa Ó Brádaigh Bean (University of Manchester), Miguel Barreto De Sousa Henriques (Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano, Bogota, Colombia), Birte Vogel (University of Manchester)

Calling Across Borders

Calling Across Borders, submitted by Sarah Jackson (Nottingham Trent University), is a collaboration with Compass Collective, a refugee arts organisation supporting young people seeking sanctuary in the UK. Through online writing workshops held during lockdown, a group of young refugees were invited to reflect on their relationship with the telephone, and to leave voicemail messages for those to whom they would most like to speak. Calling Across Borders is grounded in Jackson’s research which examines the relationship between literature and telephony, exploring the impact of the telephone’s multiple and mutating functions on how we talk, think, read and write. Bringing together research on technology, language and migration, and empowering refugee communities, the film aims to inspire new conversations between people, places, languages and cultures. 

 The team behind Calling Across Borders:

  • Director: Sarah Jackson
  • Producers: Ebrahim Esmail, Leah Gayer and Sarah Jackson
  • Sound design: Rosie Ash
  • Animation: Maria Belik
  • Featuring: Nagwa, Salma, Musharraf, Ramin, Delacky, Aden, Frank, Asiyo, Ali and Massi

Supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, Nottingham Trent University and Compass Collective

For Mahesh

For Mahesh, submitted by Dr Lucy Baker (University of Oxford), traces the day-to-day lived experiences of autorickshaw drivers who form a key component of Indian mobility systems. These services are increasingly booked through smart phones and paid for digitally, yet commuters are often unaware of the impacts of new technologies on drivers. Autorickshaw drivers are largely low-waged, self-employed and heavily reliant on cash for food and utility bills. This film is grounded in qualitative research that has engaged with Bengaluru’s historically active citizen groups, taxi drivers and taxi driver workers’ unions to address their financial exclusion and employment precarity.

The team behind For Mahesh:

  • Director: Lucy Baker
  • Production and design production: Divakar Sakkari Kuppan
  • Animated production: Sumit Chavan
  • Animation direction and secondary animation: Divakar Sakkari Kuppan
  • Voice direction and casting: Apoorva

Deep Structure

Deep Structure by artist Ilona Sagar (Royal College of Art), explores the links between architecture, health and community wellbeing through the lens of Sheffield’s Park Hill estate. Troubling the links between buildings, bodies and post-industrial landscapes, the film draws parallels between the unique sprawling structure of the building and the scientifically measured body. Designed in 1961, the estate is one of the UK’s most radical and significant post-war housing projects and a testimonial to an era that revolutionised social and residential housing. Deep Structure focuses on material structures, considering the ways in which they are measured and analysed. Hope Cement Works, which opened in 1929 and is now the largest material factory in the UK, becomes a complex monolithic space within the film, representing something in-between industrialised networks and natural systems. Entangling these connections, Deep Structure thinks about the factory and the estate as living bodies – machines for health, good and bad – considering the ways bodies and buildings are mapped, archived, and translated into data. Deep Structure complicates official narratives around its history with the lived experiences of its former inhabitants. It is a darkly speculative work that examines our uneasy and increasingly precarious relationship to public welfare, housing, and wellbeing.

 The team behind Deep Structure:

  • Filmed, directed, scripted, and edited by: Ilona Sagar
  • Cast: Lauren Chandler, Vivienne Bell, Former Residents of Park Hill: David Crossland; Mark Pearce; Howard Humphries; Joanne Marsden; Kate Reardon; Mandy Kent; Sharon Mawson; Lynn Smith; Breedon Cement Ltd, Hope Cement Works: Ed Cavanagh and Mark Dormer Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield: Daniel Geddes
  • CGI animations: Dan Fleetwood Human Studios
  • Space Syntax modelling and analysis: Prof Laura Vaughan, Director of the Space Syntax Laboratory, The Bartlett UCL; Space Syntax analysis: Pises Isarangkool Na Ayudthaya
  • Producer: Laura Clarke
  • Sound Design: Seth Scott and Ilona Sagar
  • Camera and lighting unit: Tom Nowell
  • Crew: Sebastian Nowell, Alex Stagg, Damien Gray, Craig Rihoy,
  • Production support: Rachael Duke, Mateusz Glaz, Andrew Carberry, Eleni Stavrou, Ben Morris, Ashley Holmes, Elle Stocks and Martha Wragg
  • With thanks to: Dr Alex Taylor, Reader in Human-Computer Interaction, City University of London, Prof. John Provis, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield

Preserving the Palace

With a focus on the Palace of Westminster’s environmental principles this short non-fiction documentary asks, can one of the world’s greatest iconic buildings become carbon neutral? Preserving the Palace, also nominated for the Inspiration Award, follows one of the most complex heritage renovation projects ever undertaken in the UK, including the revitalisation of the historic ventilation system and its integration into a new sustainable scheme, made possible through the research of Professor Henrik Schoenefeldt, Preserving the Palace demonstrates the impact and power of humanities research to build a bright and sustainable future.

The team behind Preserving the Palace:

  • Directors: Professor Henrik Schoenefeldt and Cameron Tucker
  • Producers: Jill Hurst, Betty Woessner, Andy Richards
  • Cinematographer: Mark Simmonite

Best Doctoral or Early Career Film of the Year

Drawing on Autism

Drawing on Autism, submitted by Alex Widdowson (Queen Mary University of London) and also nominated for the Best Animated Film of the Year, was created as part of a practice-based PhD and the Wellcome Trust-funded ‘Autism through Cinema’ project.  Widdowson's research is an investigation into the ethical issues associated with the representation of autism in animated documentaries. Despite being neurodivergent, Widdowson is not autistic, so a significant theme in the research is exploring if and how one can reliably, productively, and ethically represent another group. Created by a non-autistic filmmaker, representing an autistic participant, Drawing on Autism embraces and showcases the importance of collaborative methods to ensure that neurodivergent subjects can feedback on the ways in which they are portrayed. 

The team behind Drawing on Autism:

  • Directed, produced, and animated: Alex Widdowson
  • Featuring an anonymous autistic participant
  • Sound design and music: Vicky Freund
  • Additional animation: Ciara Kerr
  • Additional art direction: Dan Castro

Go Ahead Remix

Go Ahead Remix, submitted by Chen-Yu Lin (Universities of Nottingham and Liverpool) and also nominated for the Inspiration Award, is a documentary set in Taiwan that captures Megaport Festival, a music festival took place during the global pandemic and welcomed 40,000 attendees. The headliner was not a conventional musician but Taiwan’s Digital Minister Audrey Tang who collaborated with the Metal band, Chthonic. Go Ahead Remix examines the relationship between music and politics and shows how Megaport Festival became a site where a range of issues – including Taiwan-China relations, human rights issues in Hong Kong, Tibet and Xinjiang – were articulated and performed.

The team behind Go Ahead Remix:

  • Producer: Chen-Yu Lin
  • Director: Charlotte Sawyer

Life After Life: The Greeks of Istanbul

Life After Life: The Greeks of Istanbul, submitted by Gonul Bozoglu (Newcastle University), explores what it means for a minority community, the historic Greek (Rum) population of Istanbul, to live with a difficult past. The historic force of state persecution in Turkey shapes the world of memory in which community members live – ruinous taxes and forced labour, the 1955 Istanbul Pogrom, and the 1964 expulsions of Greeks. The Rum population of Istanbul was once 30% of the total city population; now it is 0.1%. The expellees – concentrated in Athens – are now an ageing population. This film addresses a critical problem in humanities research and memory politics: what can be done for communities who have suffered state violence, who have no prospect of official redress because of state intransigence, and whose histories may be lost? How can minority voices and stories be recognised, to counter marginalisation and forgetting, make visible hidden history and provide a community memory resource?

The team behind Life After Life: The Greeks of Istanbul:

  • Director: Gonul Bozoglu & Cem Hakverdi
  • Producer: Gonul Bozoglu & Cem Hakverdi
  • Executive Produce: Ian McDonald
  • Music: Chris Whitehead, Cafe Aman Istanbul

This film is supported by Leverhulme Trust and The Institute for Creative Arts Practice, Newcastle University.

Örö

Örö, submitted by Rob St John (Glasgow University), documents an island landscape in transition. Shot on the former military island of Örö on the Finnish Archipelago during two months of fieldwork in midwinter and midsummer, this film highlights the tensions and transitions through a landscape of nationally important ecosystems and species; decaying and rusting military structures, war graves, Iron Age burial cairns and a nascent tourism industry. Örö uses sonification techniques to turn environmental data sets into musical compositions. You hear the dynamics of a 1500-year-old Baltic seabed core (showing how human impact is altering geological formation), eutrophic algae blooms in the sea (due to warming temperatures and nutrient pollution), and photosynthesis fluctuations in an island birch tree. This film forms a new mode of documenting the tangles of life that pattern Örö, across various scales of space and time.

The team behind Örö:

  • Director/Producer/Composer/Sound Recordist: Rob St John

The Voice of Sierra Nevada

The Voice of Sierra Nevada, submitted by Agata Lulkowska (Staffordshire University), follows the story of a collective of indigenous filmmakers living in Colombia who, through the medium of film, aim to gain agency, protect their cultural identity against political and symbolic violence, decolonise and confront the misrepresentations of indigenous people made by Western filmmakers in the past. This film scrutinises the role of the academic researcher within this process and explores questions around the politics of representation, power relations and the potential to use filmmaking practices as an effective means of intercultural communication.

 The team behind The Voice of Sierra Nevada:

  • Idea, script, direction, camera, editing: Agata Lulkowska
  • Music: David Payling and Korbowod
  • On-screen participants: Amado Villafaña Chaparro, Pablo Mora, Angel Villafaña, Dilia Villafaña and Jean Carlos Molina

Best Climate Emergency Film of the Year

After Ice

After Ice, submitted by Kieran Baxter (University of Dundee), exposes the physical, aesthetic and personal impacts of recent glacier melt in the Hornafjörður region of Southeast Iceland. Over the last 30 years, glacier melt has been significantly accelerated by anthropogenic climate change. Today, by combining archival aerial photography from the National Land Survey of Iceland with current day drone footage using innovative 3D methods, researchers can shed light on the breath-taking scale of ice loss and the changing relationship between people and nature in Iceland. Where climate change communication must often resort to maps, charts and data to represent the scale of current changes, this film offers an emotive and sobering connection to a place where the impacts of global warming are writ large across the landscape.

The team behind After Ice:

  • Directed and produced by: Kieran Baxter
  • Producer: Þorvarður Árnason
  • Writer/Narrator: M Jackson

INSECURE – Intergenerational stories of a coastal community facing climate change impacts

INSECURE – Intergenerational stories of a coastal community facing climate change impacts, submitted by Katie Parsons (University of Hull), explores the dynamic and rapidly eroding coastline of the town of Withersnea and the local community’s relationship with this changing seascape. Based off of a community engagement project that encouraged young people to research and gather stories of coastal change and present their findings through poetry, stories, videos and pictures, this film demonstrates how coastal change has had a long and interlinked history with the town’s development and people’s lives.

The team behind INSECURE:

  • Creative Content: Withernsea High School Year 8 Geography Students and Community Members
  • Principal Researcher, Director & Content Editor: Katie Parsons (University of Hull)
  • CoI, Researcher and Content Editor: Florence Halstead (University of Hull)
  • CoI: Lisa Jones (University of Hull)
  • Video Editor: Matthew Cheung (University of Hull)

Kii Nche Ndutsa (Time and the Seashell)

Kii Nche Ndutsa (Time and the Seashell), submitted by Itandehui Jansen (University of Edinburgh), explores indigenous reflections on the environment and landscape. Presented through a monologue in Mixtec (an indigenous language spoken in Mexico which is currently under threat), Kii Nche Ndutsa relates the protection of Indigenous cultural heritage, and the revitalisation of threatened languages, to the protection of landscape and environment. It is the result of practice-based research into environmental cinema and was created using a combination of approaches aimed at limiting the carbon footprint of filmmaking.

The team behind Kii Nche Ndutsa:

  • Director, Cinematographer and Editor: Itandehui Jansen
  • Producer, writer and actor: Armando Bautista García
  • Original Music: Enrica Sciandrone
  • Sound Design: Ali Murray
  • Color Grading: Stephen Horne

Newland: New Vision for a Wilder Future

Farmers play a significant part in shaping and maintaining the countryside, but their voices are often unheard. Newland: New Vision for a Wilder Future, created by Suzie Cross and Dave Lynch, weaves together interviews with farmers Andrew and Ted Hughes, to explore how the agricultural community is moving towards less intensive methods of farming and adopting more sustainable practices. As science evolves, increasing our understanding of soil health and restoration, and how changes in food production can help to restore natural habitats, we should recognise the critical role that farmers play. Newland aims to dismantle the stereotypes assigned to farmers, reminding us that they care deeply about the environment and their impact on nature. It also encourages greater respect for the land from the public.

 The team behind Newland: New Vision for a Wilder Future:

  • Directed, filmed and produced by: Suzie Cross and Dave Lynch
  • Cinematography: Zsolt Sandor
  • Aerial footage: Steve Lord
  • Sound design: Martin Robinson

This film was created as part of the Land Lines: Tipping Points project at the University of Leeds, led by Professor Graham Huggan and Dr Pippa Marland.

The Promise

A young thief tries to snatch an old woman’s bag but she cannot have it without giving something in return: The Promise. It is the beginning of a journey that will change her life and a chance to change the world for good. This film, submitted by Chi Thai, is an adaptation of the New York Times Best Illustrated Book of the Year, written by Nicola Davies and illustrated by Laura Carlin. The story celebrates the practice of rewilding, both physically and metaphorically, and plays on the idea that to rewild the world you must first rewild yourself. With growing conversations about the benefits of rewilding, this film speaks directly to the underserved audiences of young children who are often left out of the climate conversation.

The team behind The Promise:

  • Director and Producer: Chi Thai
  • Author: Nicola Davies
  • Artist: Laura Carlin
  • Illustrator and Animator: Simon Ratliff
  • Voice actor (the thief): Katie Leung
  • Composer: Ruth Chan
  • Editor: Chris Chow
  • Sound Designer: Jon Clarke

Best Animated Film of the Year

Drawing on Autism

Drawing on Autism, submitted by Alex Widdowson (Queen Mary University of London) and also nominated for the Best Doctoral or Early Career Film of the Year, was created as part of a practice-based PhD and the Wellcome Trust-funded ‘Autism through Cinema’ project.  Widdowson's research is an investigation into the ethical issues associated with the representation of autism in animated documentaries. Despite being neurodivergent, Widdowson is not autistic, so a significant theme in the research is exploring if and how one can reliably, productively, and ethically represent another group. Created by a non-autistic filmmaker, representing an autistic participant, Drawing on Autism embraces and showcases the importance of collaborative methods to ensure that neurodivergent subjects can feedback on the ways in which they are portrayed. 

The team behind Drawing on Autism:

  • Directed, produced, and animated by: Alex Widdowson
  • Featuring an anonymous autistic participant
  • Sound design and music: Vicky Freund
  • Additional animation: Ciara Kerr
  • Additional art direction: Dan Castro

For Mahesh

 

For Mahesh, submitted by Dr Lucy Baker (University of Oxford), traces the day-to-day lived experiences of autorickshaw drivers who form a key component of Indian mobility systems. These services are increasingly booked through smart phones and paid for digitally, yet commuters are often unaware of the impacts of new technologies on drivers. Autorickshaw drivers are largely low-waged, self-employed and heavily reliant on cash for food and utility bills. This film is grounded in qualitative research that has engaged with Bengaluru’s historically active citizen groups, taxi drivers and taxi driver workers’ unions to address their financial exclusion and employment precarity.

The team behind For Mahesh:

  • Directed by: Lucy Baker
  • Production and design production: Divakar Sakkari Kuppan
  • Animated production: Sumit Chavan
  • Animation direction and secondary animation: Divakar Sakkari Kuppan
  • Voice direction and casting: Apoorva

Operación Berlín: The children who fought war in Colombia

Operación Berlín: The children who fought war in Colombia, submitted by Professor Paul Cooke (University of Leeds) and Dr Mat Charles (University of Rosario, Colombia), was created in collaboration with young animators and young people who conducted interviews with former child soldiers who fought under the FARC in the Colombian civil war. This film reveals a previously untold war crime - Operación Berlín – and deals with the ways in which these former child soldiers negotiated the human-rights violations they experienced at the hand of the FARC and government forces.

The team behind Operación Berlín: The children who fought war in Colombia:

  • Directed and produced by: Mat Charles
  • Lead animation: Cecilia Traslviña
  • Sound design: Carolina Lucio
  • Assistant director and producer: Nicolás Sánchez
  • Executive producer: Professor Paul Cooke

The Story of Migration

The Story of Migration, directed by Dr Benjamin Worku-Dix (PositiveNegatives/SOAS, University of London), tells the complex historical and contemporary story of migration and global inequalities. The animation, which is produced by the MIDEQ Hub led by Coventry University, challenges the idea, often misrepresented in the media, that most migration is mainly from the Global South to the Global North by showing that migration between the countries of the Global South accounts for over a third of all international migration. The Story of Migration is a product of collaboration, with its film script and storyboards having been co-created by seventeen academics across twelve countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America.

The team behind The Story of Migration:

  • Research Project Principal Investigator: Professor Heaven Crawley
  • Film Producer and Director: Dr Benjamin Worku-Dix
  • Art, Animation, Script: Karrie Fransman
  • Research Coordinator: Elise Collie
  • Editor: Jonathan Plackett
  • Sound Engineering: Richard Hughes
  • Voice Artist: Dr Gameli Tordzro

TIMELINE

Click the image above to view the trailer in Vimeo.

TIMELINE, submitted by Osbert Parker (National Film & TV School), produced in collaboration with the Migration Museum, and also nominated for the Inspiration Award, charts 400 years of British emigration – one of the largest movements of people in modern history. Today, some 75 million people self-identify as having British ancestry, greater than the population of the UK. But while immigration dominates debates, Britain’s emigration story is often overlooked. This film uses humanitarian and historical research to explore the reasons why people left and the impact of this mass movement on the world from the first English settlement in North America, to Child Migration Schemes to the signing of the Treaty of Maastricht and beyond Brexit.

The team behind TIMELINE:

  • Director/Animator/Producer: Osbert Parker
  • Sound Design: Rob Szeliga
  • Head of Creative Content (The Migration Museum): Aditi Anand
  • Curator (The Migration Museum): Sue McAlpine
  • Project Manager (The Migration Museum): Andrew Steeds
  • Head of Communications (The Migration Museum): Matthew Plowright
  • Design Assistant: Fiona Pitkin (Colorbloom)
  • Art Department Assistant: Zola Parker
  • Archive Researcher: Debbie Meniru
  • Photographer: Ethan Parker 

Inspiration Award

Go Ahead Remix

Go Ahead Remix, submitted by Chen-Yu Lin (Universities of Nottingham and Liverpool) and also nominated for the Best Doctoral or Early Career Film of the Year, is a documentary set in Taiwan that captures Megaport Festival, a music festival took place during the global pandemic and welcomed 40,000 attendees. The headliner was not a conventional musician but Taiwan’s Digital Minister Audrey Tang who collaborated with the Metal band, Chthonic. Go Ahead Remix examines the relationship between music and politics and shows how Megaport Festival became a site where a range of issues – including Taiwan-China relations, human rights issues in Hong Kong, Tibet and Xinjiang – were articulated and performed.

The team behind Go Ahead Remix:

  • Producer: Chen-Yu Lin
  • Director: Charlotte Sawyer

Preserving the Palace

With a focus on the Palace of Westminster’s environmental principles this short non-fiction documentary asks, can one of the world’s greatest iconic buildings become carbon neutral? Preserving the Palace, also nominated for the Best Research Film of the Year, follows one of the most complex heritage renovation projects ever undertaken in the UK, including the revitalisation of the historic ventilation system and its integration into a new sustainable scheme, made possible through the research of Professor Henrik Schoenefeldt, Preserving the Palace demonstrates the impact and power of humanities research to build a bright and sustainable future.

The team behind Preserving the Palace:

  • Directors: Professor Henrik Schoenefeldt and Cameron Tucker
  • Producers: Jill Hurst, Betty Woessner, Andy Richards
  • Cinematographer: Mark Simmonite

The Re-education of Ji Zhihao

The Re-education of Ji Zhihao, submitted by Tian Macleod Ji, tells the story of youth re-education during the Cultural Revolution in China, focusing on a young student from Shanghai who was sent to the Siberian border for nine years of hard labour. Several decades later he returns with his British grandnephew to revisit his past, treading old ground in search of memories. Building on the work of China’s independent filmmakers in exploring subject matter that is often absent from mainstream cinema, this film explores one of the largest social experiments in human history through an intimate and personal lens.

The team behind The Re-education of Ji Zhihao:

  • Director/Producer/Cinematographer/Editor: Tian Macleod Ji
  • Composer: Nick Ereaut
  • Sound Designer: Mikkel H. Eriksen
  • Colourist: Stephen C. Horne
  • Edit Consultants: Jonas Mortensen, S. Louisa Wei, Melinda Liu, Jeremy Taylor

TIMELINE

Click the image above to view the trailer in Vimeo.

TIMELINE, submitted by Osbert Parker (National Film & TV School), produced in collaboration with the Migration Museum, and also nominated for the Best Animated Film of the Year, charts 400 years of British emigration – one of the largest movements of people in modern history. Today, some 75 million people self-identify as having British ancestry, greater than the population of the UK. But while immigration dominates debates, Britain’s emigration story is often overlooked. This film uses humanitarian and historical research to explore the reasons why people left and the impact of this mass movement on the world from the first English settlement in North America, to Child Migration Schemes to the signing of the Treaty of Maastricht and beyond Brexit.

The team behind TIMELINE:

  • Director/Animator/Producer: Osbert Parker
  • Sound Design: Rob Szeliga
  • Head of Creative Content (The Migration Museum): Aditi Anand
  • Curator (The Migration Museum): Sue McAlpine
  • Project Manager (The Migration Museum): Andrew Steeds
  • Head of Communications (The Migration Museum): Matthew Plowright
  • Design Assistant: Fiona Pitkin (Colorbloom)
  • Art Department Assistant: Zola Parker
  • Archive Researcher: Debbie Meniru
  • Photographer: Ethan Parker 

The Wound is Where the Light Enters

The Wound is Where the Light Enters, created by Dheeraj Akolkar (Vardo Films) is inspired by a docu-dance performance titled ‘Otino Onywalo Ilum’ created by fifteen children born of war rapes in Northern Uganda and directed by Darrel Toulon. This project drew on the research at University of Birmingham which explored the life courses of children born of war rape. The changing nature of war, the strategic use of rape as a weapon of war and increased conflict-related forced migration have led to rising numbers of children born of war rapes. This film throws a light on the pain, stigma and discrimination faced by these children, and it shows paths for healing.

The team behind The Wound is Where the Light Enters:

  • Director/ Producer: Dheeraj Akolkar
  • Production Companies: Vardo Films, Grassroots Stories (U.K)
  • Production Partners: The Alpha Group (Austria), The University of Birmingham (U.K.), The University of Leipzig (Germany), FAPAD (Uganda)
  • Cinematographer: Ezequiel Romero Garcia
  • First Assistant Camera: Racheal Mambo
  • Voice Over: Atala Mercy
  • Film Edited by: Tushar Ghogale
  • Unit Production Manager: Babra Otuku
  • Film Inspired by the Performance of: Otino Onywalo Ilum
  • Otino Onywalo IIum created by: Darrel Toulon
  • Special Thanks: Dr. Sabine Lee, Dr. Heide Glaesmer, Dr. Eunice Apio